Ofsted reports and ratings often come in handy when parents
or carers are applying to schools to send their children to. Ofsted reports are
looked at in addition to school league tables, which detail which ranking the
school is placed in comparison to others based on exam results. However, league
table results only show one aspect of the school experience whereas, Ofsted
reports detail many aspects of the school both internally and externally. Ofsted
(Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills) is a
department of the UK government, with its parent department being the
Department of Education. Ofsted reports back to the Parliament about
educational institutions. Ofsted’s main aim is to review and monitor the
well-being of children and also children’s social care, also in accordance they
inspect the local school, colleges, tuitions, teacher training etc.

Ofsted inspections approximately take place every three years;
however they have the right to drop in without notice if there is any specific
concern. Ofsted check educational institutions on the basis of the efficiency
of safeguarding techniques, and whether they meet the standards set by Ofsted
whilst analysing the strengths and weaknesses of learners and leaders.
Following on to the end of an inspection, if the institution is deemed as good-
the inspectors give feedback to leaders and recommend strategies in order to
cater to the experience of learners.

If an educational institution is seen as ‘inadequate’, Ofsted
will return in order to offer support and utilise a plan in order to better the
experience. If the Ofsted report shows that an educational institution is ‘good’,
then it will continue in the three year cycle of short inspections. Getting an ‘outstanding’ rating
means that the educational institution has met high standards in delivering
education and therefore they are free from inspections and will only be
inspected in the performance rate drops.